Zero-rating programs increase wireless data prices, according to new study

New studies in Epicenter.works show that without network neutrality rules, wireless data prices can have real results. New data from dozens of countries in the European Union show that as the country accepts zero-rated programs, wireless prices rise over time.

Zero-rated programs (AT & T does not include DirecTV in the direction of customers) data usage) allows you to use certain apps and services as monthly data limits without using data. Looking at the face, it is a very solid deal for consumers, but in the long run, program critics have suggested that it will have anti-competitive effects. According to a multi-year study by Epicenter.works, countries that allow these programs have resulted in higher wireless data costs.

These programs are expressly prohibited by the Federal Communications Commission's 2015 Open Internet Order, and Internet service providers should not block or restrict consumer Internet services. When the Ajit Pai administration reversed these rules a year ago, carriers such as AT & T, Verizon, T-Mobile, and Sprint no longer violated their agency rules and were able to re-create the program.

"The Electronic Frontier Foundation adds that blogs are not only used as a means to strengthen the ISP's power over the Internet, but also as a way for consumers to pay more for wireless services.

Countries that are diversifying in a way that enforces neutrality rules.In countries that prohibit zero-rated programs, wireless data prices have fallen by about 10% a year later.

The zero-rating program has been criticized for long-term price increases, but it has the potential to stop innovation in certain markets.

As another example, T- Allowing Netflix, Amazon Prime and Hulu to stream freely. This Binge On perk There is no way to prevent carriers from walking the same way through new streaming services, although it has been phased out with a return to the data limit plan. If the zero-rated program is more prominent, it poses a serious threat to competition between music and television streaming services. You can do that.