Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus: ongoing camera review and the first 72 hours

Update: The Samsung Note 10 camera takes brilliant photos, and we tested it during the 72-hour day, taking several low-light photos of its multi-lens configuration. It is among the best camera phones in 2019, as you will see in the recently updated photo gallery below. Set your sights on "amazed" for some of these Note 10 photos.

The Samsung Galaxy Note 10 camera instantly stands out with the best camera phones in 2019, or at least that is the conclusion I am reaching before of the full review of TechRadar on Friday. We are approaching a score now that the camera has been tested.

I have already unpacked the Note 10 and offered details about the size, performance and selected camera samples. Now is the time to release a complete gallery and demonstrate the versatility of the four camera lenses and the exclusive Plus depth sensor.

The Samsung Note 10 is equipped with a normal 12MP lens with a variable aperture of f / 1.5 and f / 2.4. To explain it very briefly: the amount of light it absorbs changes depending on the lighting conditions of a room. It is quite sophisticated for a smartphone.

What stands out the most are its 12MP f / 2.1 telephoto lenses and 16MP f / 2.2 ultra wide angle lenses. They offer photos in different perspectives. I captured scenes in new ways: up close without distortion through the 2x zoom telephoto lens, and more framing with the wide angle lens, without having to go back to get everything in the shot.

After a weekend of testing, I am ready to share the good, the bad and sometimes slightly out of focus. Here is our continuous review of the Note 10 camera.

10 different Note 10 scenes captured

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera

(Image credit: Future )

Ultra Wide Lens: 42nd Street / Chrysler Building

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus Camera

(Image Credit: Future)

Normal Lens: 42nd Street / Chrysler Building

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera

(Image credit: Future)

Telephoto: 42nd Street / Chrysler Building

Above are the first Samsung Note 10 camera samples I took, and they remain my favorites because they show how the three rear cameras represent a scene in very different ways, especially that 16MP wide-angle lens.

With the ultra wide-angle lens, you can see 42nd Street and the iconic New York City Taxi in the other two photos. An obvious fisheye effect is happening, and that means that tall buildings exhibit a curve, but that is part of the charm of this particular Note 10 camera and makes the urban landscape seem legitimately intimidating.

The street and all the chaos of Manhattan is not part of the other two photos that use the normal telephoto lens. But if I wanted the Chrysler building alone, the telephoto lens is there to get the best shot of its perched gargoyles.

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera sample

(Image credit: future)

Ultra wide-angle lens: cropped and edited reflective photo (best of both worlds)

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera sample

(Image credit: Future)

Normal lens: cuts the top and bottom of the subject

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera sample

(Image credit: Future)

Ultra-Wide lens: all in the frame, maybe too much

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera sample

(Image credit: Future)

Ultra wide lens: cropped before edition

My second set of favorite Note 10 camera photos is this, and again demonstrates how useful the ultra-wide-angle camera can be in certain situations s.

The first photo you see here is the & # 39; finished product & # 39 ;; It was taken with the ultra wide angle lens and has had some editions, some basic Adobe Lightroom color corrections (only using the basic slider tools) and clipping. I used the ultra wide angle lens because the normal lens of the Note 10 did not do justice to this reflex (photo 2): the building is cut at the top and at the bottom in the reflection.

Because I didn't do it. I want to be splattered by the nearby traffic (you can see a lot of yellow cabs almost looking at me), I didn't have enough time to go back and rethink the shot. With a quick change to the ultra wide angle camera (photo 3), I was able to take a more inclusive photo and crop it later (photo 4); the image was edited to produce photo 1, with which I am much happier at the end.

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 camera

(Image credit: Future) [19659012] Color Mode Focus Live Focus

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  Samsung Galaxy camera Note 10

(Image credit: Future)

Focus Live Focus Color Mode

Image 3 of 3 [19659010] Samsung Galaxy Note 10 camera "class =" lazy-image lazy-image- loading lazyload optional-image "onerror =" this.parentNode.replaceChild (window.missingImage (), this) "data-normal =" https://vanilla.futurecdn.net/techradar/media/img/missing-image.svg "src =" https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/4JQvsw2VqmC6xQRCrSqLJY-320-80.jpg "data- data-original-mos =" https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/4JQvsw2VqmC6xQRCrSqLJY .jpg "data-pin-media =" https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/4JQvsw2VqmC6xQRCrSqLJY.jpg "/>

(Image Credit: Future)

Color Focus Focus Live Focus [19659021] Color Point was my favorite camera mode when reviewing the Samsung Galaxy S 10 and the S10 Plus, and the filter debuting in the Note series with Note 10.

This shows the background and parts of the foreground in black and white, but keeps the main subject in color so that the person or object Really leave the scene. It is not always perfect: you can see that part of the red tomato is in color and part is not, and the glass is also in color. A couple of photographer's adjustments and several attempts to be safe (just hit the shutter button until it works) generally solve these problems.

It's a really fun way to capture a scene, and Samsung does it better than anyone. (Especially Motorola, which has tried the same with mediocre results).

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera

(Image credit: Future)

Color Point vs Regular Photo

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  Samsung camera Galaxy Note 10 Plus

(Image Credit: Future)

Color Point vs. Regular Photo

Here is another great example of an image in Color Point mode next to a normal full color photo. I don't want people at the bottom of the shot (sorry, friends), and the Color Point Live Focus mode makes them much less annoying.

The full color shot is taken with an aperture of f / 1.5 (it is a bit dark in the restaurant), as is the black and white photo of Color Point. The interesting thing is that the Color Point mode (and all Live Focus modes) allow you to switch between the normal and telephoto lenses (the latter is always the default).

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera

(Image credit: future)

Note 10 vs Pixel 3 in low light: photo Note 10 (normal mode) [19659013] Image 2 of 4

  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera

(Image credit: Future)

Note 10 vs Pixel 3 in low light: photo Note 10 (night mode) [19659013] Image 3 of 4

  Google Pixel 3 camera sample

(Credit image: Future)

Note 10 vs Pixel 3 in low light: Google Pixel 3 (regular mode)

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  Google Pixel 3 camera sample

(Image credit: Future) [19659012] Note 10 vs Pixel 3 in low light: Google Pixel 3 (Night Sight mode)

This .. You need more tests. I used Samsung's new night mode on the Note 10 (it appeared on the S10, S10 Plus and S10e through a software update after the release of those phones).

The first photo shows what Samsung cameras do in low light environments: they amplify up to exposure, and soft, soft and smooth again. It seems that my skin went through an old-school family portrait editing session. Samsung night mode (photo 2) further increases exposure, but the grain can be seen everywhere, especially in curtains. However, it is definitely brighter.

I launched a Google Pixel 3 photo taken with the famous Night Sight mode of that phone. It does a better job of keeping the details and tamping the grain, but in the end it is also noisy. This is a dark photo, which means that the Note 10 camera requires more bar testing. "Baby, please"

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  Samsung Galaxy Note 10 camera sample

(Image credit: Future)

Note 10 vs Pixel 3 lowlight: night mode Note 10 [19659013] Image 2 of 2

  Google Pixel 3 camera

(Image credit: Future)

Note 10 vs Pixel 3 in low light: Pixel 3 night mode

Use In the Samsung Note 10 night mode outside, we certainly get a brighter image. The camera likes to do the following:

  • Increases brightness (especially in low light shots)
  • Paints colors with more saturation
  • Softens everything in sight like a steam roller (again, especially with photos in low light) [19659099] That works quite well in some situations, although one could argue that the Pixel 3 comparison shot provides a more melancholy and more real scene. We will continue testing the night mode prior to our full review of Note 10 Plus on Friday.

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      Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera

    (Image credit: Future)

    Color Point photo in focus

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      Camera Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus

    (Image credit: Future)

    Color Point photo out of focus

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      Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera [19659004] (Image credit: Future)

    Normal lens – focused

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      Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera

    (Image credit: future)

    Photo normal out of focus

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      Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera

    (Image credit: Future)

    Telephoto lens – focused

    Image 6 of 7 [19659010] Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera ” class=” lazy-image lazy-image-loading lazyload optional-image” onerror=”this.parentNode.replaceChild(window.missingImage(),this)” data-normal=”https://vanilla.futurecdn.net/techradar/media/img/missing-image.svg” src=”https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/MTL4FP6YhwUi5Zqja6LDf-320-80.jpg” data- data-original-mos=”https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/MTL4FP6YhwUi5Zqja6LDf.jpg” data-pin-media=”https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/MTL4FP6YhwUi5Zqja6LDf.jpg”/>

    (Image credit: Future)

    Telephoto lens – out of focus

    Image 7 of 7 [19659010] Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera "class =" lazy-image lazy-image-loading lazyload optional-image "onerror =" this.parentNode.replaceChild (window.missingImage (), this) "data-normal =" https: //vanilla.futurecdn.net/techradar/media/img/missing-image.svg "src =" https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/ucoX3K9gQJcBTUY4YR8FP5-320-80.jpg "data- data-original -mos = "https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/ucoX3K9gQJcBTUY4YR8FP5.jpg" data-pin-media = "https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/ucoX3K9gQJcBTUY4YR8FP5.jpg" /> [19659004] (Image credit: future)

    Ultra wide-angle lens – focused

    I said that I would highlight the good, the bad and sometimes slightly out of focus. Trying to get normal and telephoto lenses to focus on the subject in Color Point mode can be difficult, but it can also be the case with normal snapshots, as you can see in the images above. I gave myself permission to eat a donut for this test. A donut was damaged by creating this photo gallery of Note 10.

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      Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera sample

    (Image credit: Future)

    Modes Live Focus plus Color Point

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      Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus camera sample

    (Image credit: Future)

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      Camera sample Samsung Galaxy Note 10 Plus

    (Image credit: Future)

    Color Point receives full attention, and for good reason. It is the best new camera mode of Samsung, and this is the first time we see it on a Note phone. But there are other Live Focus modes besides this one.

    There is Spin (photo 1) and Zoom (photo 2), a normal blur effect, and the new Big Big Circles filter that makes the lights in the background blurry and bulbous. (seen in the following set of photos).

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      Samsung Galaxy Note 10 plus camera

    (Image credit: Future)

    Remote selfie mode and Big Circles Live Focus [19659013] Image 2 of 4 [19659010] Samsung Galaxy Note 10 plus camera ” class=” lazy-image lazy-image-loading lazyload optional-image” onerror=”this.parentNode.replaceChild(window.missingImage(),this)” data-normal=”https://vanilla.futurecdn.net/techradar/media/img/missing-image.svg” src=”https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/vVgso6cvJ9BCdHWsbDzARS-320-80.jpg” data- data-original-mos=”https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/vVgso6cvJ9BCdHWsbDzARS.jpg” data-pin-media=”https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/vVgso6cvJ9BCdHWsbDzARS.jpg”/>

    (Image credit: Future)

    Remote selfie mode and color point

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      Samsung Galaxy Note 10 plus camera

    (Image credit: future)

    Remote selfie and close-up perspective

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      Samsung Galaxy Note 10 plus camera

    (Image credit: Future)

    Remote selfie and perspective without cropping

    Here is a good example of the Big Circles mode with the 10MP front camera, and an example of a shot taken remotely, using the S Pen to shoot the shutter.

    The Samsung S Pen has always been a useful stylus, but it became a remote shutter of the Bluetooth camera with Note 9. last year. That feature returns, along with other gesture controls to slide through the camera menus and zoom in and out. Color Point appears in (photo 2) along with a cropped selfie (photo 3) when Samsung's front camera is automatically cropped in front of the wider selfie (an uncropped version, photo 4) that you can select instead.

    Samsung Galaxy Note 10 camera tests continue

    I tested the Note 10 camera for a whole weekend and most of Monday. That's not enough to put a stamp on the review, but I'm closer after 72 hours (well, a little more after writing and uploading photos; Samsung's photo transfer software leaves much to be desired, what I'm going to Mention in the review

    Deep camera analysis is not carried out. Too often, the reviews do not take into account the video capabilities of smartphones, and that is what I will do on Mondays and Tuesdays. Samsung Note 10 image has been improved, according to Samsung, and I will test it in side-by-side comparisons. Stay tuned for more updates as the week progresses and the Note 10 flexes your multi-chamber muscles.

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Updated: August 20, 2019 — 1:42 am