Google Stadia wants YouTubers to play with fans, but that could leave creators open to attacks


Google wants its next game broadcast service, Stadia, to raise the ante for games broadcast live on YouTube, but Google did not address the many ways in which its system could lead to harassment, demonetization and other problems for creators 19659002] One of Stadia's most exciting developments for YouTube creators is "Crowd Play," a feature that allows creators to play games like NBA 2K19 with their viewers. It seems like a good idea on the surface, but Google's presentation did not mention any potential damage that could come from Crowd Play. For just over an hour, several members of the Google Stadia team and YouTube game manager Ryan Wyatt talked about the benefits that Stadia had for players and creators. The game is more fluid, said Google Stadia boss Phil Harrison; Wyatt told YouTubers that it would open a new world of interaction and commitment with fans.

Neither Harrison nor Wyatt addressed one of the most important questions: how easily can bad actors take advantage of Crowd Play?

Imagine a popular YouTube creator with a sizeable audience. They have an army of dedicated fans who follow them everywhere and are ready to line up to have the opportunity to play a game with their favorite YouTuber. Stadia is a perfect way to integrate that community of loyal supporters into a more collaborative space; Live broadcast with fans is the digital equivalent of signing autographs after a show.

Crowd Play presents this opportunity, but neither Google nor YouTube explained how the queuing system worked. A popular YouTuber known for game broadcasts, such as DanTDM or Jacksepticeye, can attract trolls who deliberately line up just for the chance to shout offensive or hateful words in the flow. When that happens, it is often the creators who host the flow who have to deal with the consequences. So, if a creator is using Stadia, what Google and YouTube want them to do, what protects them from flagrant abuse?

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